Sport

Time for Sydney FC players to take some responsibility

Terry McFlynn of Sydney FC looks on during a Sydney FC A-League training session at ANZ Stadium.
Terry McFlynn of Sydney FC looks on during a Sydney FC A-League training session at ANZ Stadium. Cameron Spencer / Getty Images

SYDNEY FC captain Terry McFlynn said this week the players failed former coach Ian Crook, who on Sunday decided his health and family had to come first and he had no choice but to quit.

What I can't understand - and it's not the first time this has happened and it certainly won't be the last - is why does it take a coach or manager to quit before players realise they have let him down.

Too many times in the past - and this is not something unique to football - players see a coach quit or get the sack after a string of poor performances and in the next game somehow manage to peak and earn a win, which had previously looked beyond them.

You can almost guarantee the players will fire up against Brisbane Roar tonight and more than likely get a positive result.

But that's no good to Crook now, he needed that support last week and the week before and he didn't get it.

"It's a collective and it has always been a collective at this club," McFlynn said after Crook fell on his sword.

"There has never been any blame laid on one person's shoulder. We win together and we lose together, and it's sad when anybody loses their job.

"We have a professional duty to the football club (to) give 100% day in, day out."

Well I am sorry, Terry, players have not given 100% for Crook otherwise the club would not now be looking for a new man at the helm.

What I can't understand, and it's always baffled me, is why is it always the coach that has to go?

Why can't the players be in the firing line (so to speak).

Let's face it, if you or I performed as the Sydney FC players had done in the past two games then there's a chance you would be sacked or at the very least forced to answer some very tough questions about under-performing.

Why does it always take a coach to get the elbow for players to perform?

Coaches and managers at the highest level are in an untenable postition. They live and die by results.

So why is that not the same for the players?

Yes, coaches and managers get a more-than decent pay packet and, of course, they have to take some of the blame if results are not coming out on the pitch.

But once the players cross that white line, there is not much any coach can do to make them perform any better.

Yes, tactics can be questioned but the coach cannot score goals, he cannot make tackles. That is all down to the players.

They should have to take much more responsibility. They get paid obscene amounts of money to put on a show and if they don't they must be held accountable.

Sadly for Ian Crook, he felt he could not go on any more the way it was.

The word on the street is he is a fantastic coach who enjoyed the behind-the-scenes work but could not handle everything that went with being the man under the spotlight.

He might have enjoyed it more had the players done their jobs too - sadly the realisation from McFlynn and co came too late.

Topics:  a-league, ian crook, sydney fc, terry mcflynn


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