Lifestyle

Kate, I'm so feeling your pain!

Naomi Steinhardt embraces her baby bump in Nerima Gardens in Queens Park. Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge is reported to be pregnant and suffering with morning sickness. Photo: Claudia Baxter / The Queensland Times
Naomi Steinhardt embraces her baby bump in Nerima Gardens in Queens Park. Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge is reported to be pregnant and suffering with morning sickness. Photo: Claudia Baxter / The Queensland Times Claudia Baxter

AS THE world awoke to news a royal baby was on the way, one mum was thrilled - and a little anxious - for HRH Kate.

It's still unclear at what stage the Duchess of Cambridge's pregnancy is, but at 14 weeks Naomi Steinhardt is only a little way ahead of the royal mum-to-be.

Ms Steinhardt, of Bundamba, already has two children and knows all too well what an ordeal morning sickness can be, but says she can't imagine the severity of HRH Kate's condition.

News of Kate's baby was broken to the world's press after she was admitted to the King Edward VII Hospital in London suffering from a severe form of morning sickness called hyperemesis gravidarum.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge announced the pregnancy on their website, and added that they expected Kate to be in hospital for several days, with a rest period thereafter.

Kate's condition "requires supplementary hydration and nutrients", their statement read.

Expectant Bundamba mum Naomi Steinhardt said she was very happy for Kate, but empathised with the sick duchess.

"I always get excited when I hear someone's pregnant; when I hear babies are born I often have a little cry," Ms Steinhardt said.

However, Ms Steinhardt said morning sickness could not only be difficult, but could also be a health risk.

"This is my third child, and I had morning sickness all through my second pregnancy," she said.

"This times it's on and off, and I've never had it that seriously that I needed to go to hospital, but during my last pregnancy I was working and had to rush to the bathroom every half an hour to an hour to be sick.

"Pregnancy can change so quickly, and every pregnancy is different, so it's hard to imagine exactly what she'd be going through."

Janet Knowles, the nurse unit manager of the Ipswich Hospital's maternity ward, said pregnant women weren't often admitted for morning sickness.

"Morning sickness is quite common between four to 16 weeks, but only about one woman a month is hospitalised with a severe case, and to put that into perspective we have 3000 births a year," she said.

"Most of the time it'll stop by about 20 weeks, but everyone is different."

Ms Knowles said that Kate's very public pregnancy announcement and ensuing battle with morning sickness would help people to understand how serious the condition could be.

"Some people think 'oh, it's just morning sickness', but it can be debilitating," Ms Knowles said.

"By the time women are taken to hospital because of morning sickness, it's not morning sickness any more - they're often dehydratedand require a drip."

Kate's pregnancy is still in the early stages, and The Queen, The Duke of Edinburgh, The Prince of Wales, The Duchess of Cornwall, Prince Harry and other family members are "delighted with the news," the royal family's official website said.

Topics:  catherine middleton, duchess of cambridge, editors picks, morning sickness, royal baby




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