Lifestyle

Titanic story for Camira mother of two

Granddaughter of the longest living survivor of the Titanic Dawn Pincott of Camira with Tiffany (centre), 12, and Laura, 17 (no surname - foster kids). Photo: David Nielsen / The Queensland Times
Granddaughter of the longest living survivor of the Titanic Dawn Pincott of Camira with Tiffany (centre), 12, and Laura, 17 (no surname - foster kids). Photo: David Nielsen / The Queensland Times David Nielsen

IT comes up at the dinner table from time to time, but most people close to Dawn Pincott don't know her grandmother survived the Titanic.

Titanic survivor Edith Brown. Photo: Contributed
Titanic survivor Edith Brown. Photo: Contributed Contributed

The Camira mother of two was the granddaughter of one of the oldest living survivors of the Titanic - Edith Haisman (nee Brown).

Mrs Haisman was 15 when her family boarded RMS Titanic in 1912 in Southampton, England.

Her father was taking her and her mother to New York to open a hotel business. Everything they owned, tableware, furnishings and 1000 rolls of bed linen for the new venture was packed into the Titanic's hold.

Mrs Pincott said the night Titanic struck an iceberg on April 14, 1912, haunted her grandmother for the rest of her life.

"She remembered the screams and the noises of the ship falling apart," Mrs Pincott said. "Once the ship sank, there was no sound and the ocean looked like glass.

She remembered the screams and the noises of the ship falling. Once it sank, there was no sound and the ocean looked like glass.

"She had nightmares for years."

In a series of interviews throughout her lifetime, Mrs Haisman gave vivid accounts of what happened during Titanic's final moments. She said her father woke her and her mother, telling them to put on their life jackets and something warm.

On deck, a steward had told them the ship had struck an iceberg, but said it was nothing to worry about.

Mrs Haisman remembered the band playing ragtime music to keep spirits high, while passengers said she's unsinkable, she won't go down.

"No one panicked, they just got up to see what was going on," Mrs Pincott said. "People were still dancing, the band was playing.

"There was ice coming onto the deck from the iceberg. People weren't worried, they were picking it up and putting it in there drinks."

Mrs Haisman's father kissed her and her mother as they boarded Lifeboat 14. She never saw her father again.

"It was women and children first and she said to her father: 'Come with us" and he told them: 'No I will see you in New York'," Mrs Pincott said.

"They were buying a restaurant in New York. They were very wealthy. They had all their belongings on the ship, but nothing was insured."

Mrs Haisman's last memory of her father was of him smoking a cigar and sipping brandy as they were lowered into the lifeboat.

"It was very cold and the lifeboat leaked," Mrs Pincott said. "She could hear screaming and there were dead bodies everywhere, like in the movie.

"Once I watched the movie it became more real to me."

Mrs Haisman later migrated to Australia to live with her 10 children. After a few years in Queensland she moved back to Southampton.

In 1993, Mrs Haisman received a gold watch, thought to be her father's, which had been discovered during a diving expedition on the Titanic wreck.

Three years later, at 99 years of age, she travelled on a cruise ship to the location of the disaster and laid a rose in the Atlantic Ocean where Mrs Haisman last saw her father. Mrs Haisman died in 1997, aged 100.

"Even to this day, I still see my grandmother on TV talking about Titanic," Mrs Pincott said. "I've always wondered why there was such a big interest in the Titanic - there's been lots of disasters over the years but this one seems to have stuck."

I've always wondered why there was such a big interest in the Titanic - there's been lots of disasters over the years but this one seems to have stuck.

Granddaughter of the longest living survivor of the Titanic Dawn Pincott of Camira. Photo: David Nielsen / The Queensland Times
Granddaughter of the longest living survivor of the Titanic Dawn Pincott of Camira. Photo: David Nielsen / The Queensland Times David Nielsen

A piece of the Titanic wreck now sits tucked away in the Pincott home, a reminder of the family's secret.

David Haisman, Mrs Pincott's uncle, last year produced a book about Edith Haisman's story.

"When I was in hospital last year, the anniversary of the Titanic's sinking, I saw her on TV," Mrs Pincott said. "The nurse was talking me and I was telling her: 'Shush, that's my grandmother'."

Topics:  big read, opinion, titanic




WATCH: Aussie Racing Cars champ rolls six times

Dramatic Aussie Car rollover at Queensland Raceway on Saturday.

Pingel walks away from high-speed crash

Introducing Winter, Diesel, Rusty and Benson

Winter is coming - hopefully to a home with you. But don't worry, I won't bring cold and terror to your lives (like on Game of Thrones). My aim is to bring you love and fun . I am full of beans and ready for adventure .

Phone the RSPCA on 3426 9999 for more details about these animals

Today's community notices billboard

Historical Ipswich home Rockton House. Photo: Rob Williams / The Queensland Times

Toastmaster, Tai Chi, Scouts, the Men's Shed and more

Latest deals and offers

What's on the small screen this week

MasterChef Australia's final four contestants, from left, Harry Foster, Elena Duggan, Elise Franciskovic and Matt Sinclair.

MASTERCHEF makes way for The Bachelor on Ten's reality TV slate.

Recycling your childhood faves

GHOST GIRL: Melissa McCarthy, Kate McKinnon, Kristen Wiig and Leslie Jones in a scene from Ghostbusters.

Everything that's old is new again

Guy Sebastian a hit at Splendour in the Grass

Guy Sebastian performs at Splendour in the Grass with Paces.

REALITY TV judge a hit with festival crowd.

Superheroes of the big screen enjoy sounds of Splendour

CHRIS Hemsworth and his Avengers mates drop by Byron festival.

Indigenous artist shows tourists secrets of Aboriginal painting

Ever thought "I could do that" about Aboriginal art?

Dynamic pics from Splendour Day 1

The Strokes perform at Splendour in the Grass 2016. Photo Marc Stapelberg / The Northern Star

Check out the latest pictures from Splendour in the Grass.

You can own this Queensland town for just $1

Yelarbon

Unprecedented auction of town's business centre with no reserve

Work starts on $15M Caloundra apartment building

Turning the first sod at the Aqua View Apartments site in Kings Beach are (from left) husband-and-wife developers Alex Yuan and Stella Sun with construction company Tomkins director Mike Tomkins and Councillor Tim Dwyer.

Developers excited about addition to Kings Beach skyline

72-year-old Coast developer set to start new project

GREEN LIGHT: The Cosmopolitan has been approved for development at Cotton Tree.

Meet the Canberran set to deliver another chapter for Coast suburb

Plans revealed for 1500-lot 'master-planned community'

Precinct will be bounded by Boundary St and Shoesmith Rd

Ecco Ripley sales run sparks prime release

MOVING IN: Sekisui House has announced the release of more residential blocks at Ecco Ripley.

Sekisui House is preparing to unveil more land at Ecco Ripley

The climb is slow but property on the way up

Michael Matusik, director of Matusik Property Insights.Photo Allan Reinikka / The Morning Bulletin

The improvement would be mild when compared to past cycles