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Disruptive kids impacting teacher effectiveness

BAD students in Queensland's state schools are hijacking the education system, the peak body of primary school principals has warned.

The Queensland Association of State School Principals wrote a submission to the Senate inquiry investigating what needs to be done to improve the nation's schools.

In its submission, QASSP outlined numerous issues stemming from combined factors including misbehaving students, a lack of resources and problem teachers.

The association wrote that the impact of misbehaving and disruptive children in classrooms around the state was a "massive factor impacting teacher effectiveness".

"School administrators spend untold hours attempting to deliver a balance between ensuring engagement and participation of every child, including the most disruptive child while not at the expense of the well-behaved and compliant student," it wrote.

The association said there was a general rule in Queensland state schools that teachers spent 80% of their time on the 20% of misbehaving students, leaving the other 80% of children only supported for 20% of a normal school day.

"Education needs more support to ensure this hijacking of the school day by the misbehaving students is heavily reduced - then a right to quality education for all can be delivered effectively," the submission reads.

The association wrote that the problem students weren't the only issue in the state's education system with a lack of resources hindering teachers' ability to do their jobs.

This lack of resources, especially internet access and new technology, was a growing problem, due in part to the growing number of students who had such technology at home and expected access to it for study.

Another problem educators faced was a "litigious environment", where principals and teachers were forced to spend more time on complying with health and safety obligations rather than spending that time on students.

But the association also offered some solutions, outlining a case to the Senate committee for increased funding - in line with the Gonski Review proposals - as well as better training opportunities for teachers.

The Senate inquiry is due to report in March next year.

Topics:  queensland education, schools




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