Sport

Creedy on board for big ironwoman series result

Rebecca Creedy is feeling confident after a good start in the opening round of this year’s Telstra Ironwoman Series.
Rebecca Creedy is feeling confident after a good start in the opening round of this year’s Telstra Ironwoman Series. John Mccutcheon

AFTER securing fourth place at the opening round of this year's Telstra Ironwoman Series in Perth, Met Caloundra's Rebecca Creedy is confident she can deliver a career-best season.

Consistency was the key to Creedy's strong performance in WA, winning the swim, grabbing third in the ski leg and winning the ironwoman race.

Despite the impressive trio of results, Creedy missed the overall podium, with her last in the board race costing her ground on her opponents.

"The board was a bit of a letdown. I didn't execute very well and my skills just weren't up to scratch," she said.

Despite the board event, which Creedy said she has been working relentlessly on improving, she is buoyed by the way she competed in the opening round of the season, building on her ironwoman final win at the national championships.

"I've been working a lot on my consistency, and at Scarborough (Perth) I managed my best ever results for a first-round race," she said.

The 29-year-old, two months shy of 30, is also aware that in terms of longevity in her sport, time is not on her side and at her age any race could potentially be her last.

So it did not make sense to look too far into the future, she said.

Despite this, Creedy is still making plans for her life after ironwoman, completing her degree in environmental science almost two years ago. She is eager to put her degree to use.

She said she could not keep competing forever, highlighting the lack of money in her sport.

"I'm stuck between a bit of a rock and a hard place. I want to use my degree, but I really love racing too, and I don't have that much time left in the sport," she said.

"If I have a really great season this year, it's going to be very hard to walk away from it, especially if I improve my overall ranking in the series."

Like most surf lifesaving competitors, sacrifice is part of the daily routine for Creedy, who recently knocked back a fulltime dream job using her degree to continue her pursuit of excellence in the Telstra Ironwoman Series.

For now her main focus is on the upcoming race at Newcastle, on January 12, and continuing to improve her board work.

She made a mistake on the board in the corresponding round last year that cost her dearly.

"I need to be really switched on and a bit more positive on the board," she said.

"I was happy with how I paddled in the ironwoman in Scarborough. The waves were a bit bigger and it was more enjoyable."

Topics:  ironwoman, rebecca creedy, surf life saving




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